VIA Motors showcased the production-ready version of its extended-range electric vehicle (eREV) pickup truck today in downtown San Francisco, delivering a pair of the vehicles to California utility company Pacific Gas and Electric for testing as part of its work vehicle fleet.
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Plug it in

Located behind the VIA badge in the eREV's grille is a SAE J1772 standard vehicle charging port.
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Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/CNET / Caption by:

asoline V-6

The eREV is based on Chevrolet's Silverado. Via chose to leave the 4.3 liter V-6 engine in place. However, much like the Chevrolet Volt, the gasoline engine only fires up to extend the truck's range after the battery pack's 40-mile (more or less) range is depleted.
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Charging

The VIA eREV's 15-kilowatt battery pack can be charged using a fast charging station, by plugging into a standard 110-volt or 220-volt outlet, via the regenerative braking system, or with the truck's gasoline engine.
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VIA V-Drive

VIA Motors' proprietary 650-volt eREV system was designed to be modular, which means that the technology can be applied to a wide range of full-size trucks, vans, and SUVs beyond the PG&E trial.
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A generator on wheels

An interesting bonus to toting around 15 kilowatts of electricity in its battery pack is that that the VIA Motors eREV can potentially supply enough on-site power for a small- to medium-size house. Armed with this technology, PG&E technicians can power their tools with the vehicle or, in the future, eliminate planned power outages for maintenance.
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Fleet vehicle cabin

The two eREV pickups delivered to PG&E today are, at their most basic, fleet vehicles. So don't expect much tech to make its way into the spartan cabin.
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VIA eREV cargo van

VIA did showcase an electrified cargo van that featured a slightly more high-tech cabin treatment.
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Touch-screen dashboard

Integrated into the van's dashboard was an Apple iPad running proprietary fleet and vehicle management software. Eventually, VIA would like to offer this to its clientele.
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Efficiency display

Using the iPad's interface, drivers and dispatchers are able to monitor how efficiently the vehicle is being driven.
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Energy usage screen

Historical fuel economy, time spent in full electric mode, and operating cost savings to the company can also be viewed.
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Navigation options

Navigation, weather forecasts, traffic, and trip planning are all built into the interface to help operators get to the work sites.
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Fleet management

Finally, Web-connected software puts the driver in contact with the dispatcher for more efficient fleet management.
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Information display

The eREV pickup that was delivered to PG&E features a much more basic version of this interface that only really gives access to power-train information. If you're not a VIA engineer, most of this will likely look like gibberish.
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