Dell Studio 15

The good: Borrows some of the best design features of the more expensive XPS line; built-in media remote control.

The bad: Bulkier than the 15-inch XPS model; just under the wire for new Centrino 2 chips.

The bottom line: Dell's first release from its new Studio line, the Studio 15, sits between the Inspiron and XPS lines and offers a good mix of features for the price, but we'd be tempted to save up a few extra dollars for a thinner, lighter XPS.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Acer Aspire One D150

The good: Very inexpensive 10-inch Netbook; decent keyboard and battery.

The bad: Heavy for a Netbook, terrible touch pad and mouse buttons.

The bottom line: The new 10-inch Aspire One AOD150 will further cement Acer's lead in the Netbook market, largely on account of its rock-bottom price.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Apple MacBook (Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz, NVIDIA GeForce 9400M)

The good: New aluminum construction looks good, feels solid; giant touch pad; attractive edge-to-edge glass on display; improved integrated graphics; backlit keyboard on some models; thinner than previous version.

The bad: Still no ExpressCard or SD-card slot; loses FireWire port; all-clicking touch pad is a bit awkward, at least initially; $1,299 now gets you a slower CPU than it did before; no matte-screen option.

The bottom line: Apple's redesigned 13-inch MacBook is essentially a shrunken version of the more expensive 15-inch Pro line. With its new aluminum body, new trackpad, and Nvidia graphics, it's an even more attractive choice for mainstream laptop buyers than was the plastic model it replaces.

Read the full review here.

Note: this is a version of the MacBook from earlier in 2009. Please see our reviews of the current 13-inch MacBook Pro and 13-inch MacBook.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Asus Eee PC 1000HE

The good: Excellent battery life; improved keyboard; competitively priced.

The bad: Slightly faster Intel Atom CPU fails to impress; other Netbook-makers have shown more innovation.

The bottom line: Asus practically invented the Netbook market, and the Eee PC 1000HE is an overdue overhaul that offers a new CPU and great battery life, but misses some of the competition's bells and whistles.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Dell Inspiron Mini 9/Mini 10v

Note: While the Dell Mini 9 was the sixth most popular laptop of 2009, it's no longer available, so we instead point you towards the current Dell Mini 10v.

The good: Same basic chassis as Dell's more expensive Netbooks; very low entry price.

The bad: Limited configuration options; inset screen is not as nice as the Mini 10's edge-to-edge glass.

The bottom line: Dell's Mini 10v keeps a lot of the features of the more expensive Mini 10, while dropping the price below $300. It's one of only a handful of $299 Netbooks that doesn't look and feel especially cheap.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

HP Pavilion dv3510nr

Note: This model is no longer available, but you can still find the CNET Archive version of the original review below.

According to Best Buy's Blue Label program, the features its customers wanted most in a laptop are longer battery life, a thin and lightweight design, but with a roomy screen, and a backlit keyboard--all backed with "superior" support. The HP Pavilion dv3510nr hits on all of these points, and it looks good doing it. Actually listening to your customers seems to be a savvy move if the Pavilion dv3510nr is any indication.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

HP Mini 1000

Note: This model is no longer available, but you can still find the CNET Archive version of the original review below.

It may seem as if Hewlett-Packard is arriving somewhat late to the Netbook game with its Mini 1000, but the company's business division has offered a similar system, the 2133 Mini-Note PC since the spring of this year. That model scored points with the best Netbook keyboard we've seen and a solid metal construction, but the wimpy VIA processor (and a higher price than other Netbooks) kept it from being a top contender.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Apple MacBook Pro Summer 2009

The good: Adds SD card slot and reacquires FireWire; lower starting price; same solid unibody construction and giant multitouch trackpad.

The bad: Nonremovable battery; no matte screen or discrete graphics options.

The bottom line: Previously known as the MacBook, Apple's basic 13-inch aluminum unibody laptop has been promoted to the "Pro" series, all while adding features and cutting the base price.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

HP 2140 Mini-Note

The good: Solid metal construction; full ExpressCard/54 slot; big keyboard.

The bad: Odd resolution loses a few pixels; no mobile-broadband options (yet); awkward mouse button placement.

The bottom line: HP offers a premium version of its plastic Mini 1000 while keeping the price down, making the Mini 2140 the Netbook to beat.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Asus Eee PC 1005HA

The good: Sleek, attractive design; lower price; amazing battery.

The bad: Thicker and heavier than the previous model; still near the upper end of the Netbook price range.

The bottom line: Asus hits nearly all the marks in the 1005HA, the latest version of its iconic Eee PC, highlighted by a 6-hour-plus battery life.

Read the full review here.

Updated:
Photo by: CNET / Caption by:
Hot Galleries

CNET's Tech Minute

Top 3 news reading apps

With the latest tech, getting news delivered to your phone is easier than ever. Here's a roundup of apps that are customizable and useful for getting the news.

Hot Products