Transit of Venus

This afternoon, Venus began its "transit" across the face of the sun as the planet passed directly between the Sun and Earth, a rare and spectacular sight for skywatchers. The next transit will take place in 2117.

While in Los Angeles for the Electronics Entertainment Expo, better known as E3, we paid a visit to the Griffith Observatory, where hundreds gathered to gaze through homemade telescopes and the observatory's own powerful eyes.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Griffith Observatory

The Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, where hundreds of people gathered Tuesday on the lawn to see Venus as it passes between the Earth and the sun.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Venus approaches the Sun

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite captures Venus transit approach.
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Photo by: NASA/SDO, AIA / Caption by:

No. 14 welder's glass filter

Hobbyist astronomers brought dozens of telescopes to the lawn in front of the Griffith Observatory. Here, CNET's Daniel Terdiman hold a filter of No. 14 welder's glass, which provided a perfect viewing filter.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

No. 14 welder's glass filter

This cropped RAW photo was taken with a Canon 5DMKII and a 200mm lens at 3:36 p.m. PT through the No. 14 welder's glass filter at the Griffith Observatory.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Griffith Observatory's Coelostat

Griffith Observatory's Coelostat telescopes projects an image of the sun directly into the west rotunda of the Ahmanson Hall of the Sky.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Coelostat throught the iPad

CNET's Daniel Terdiman take a photo of the Griffith Observatory's Coelostat projection with an iPad. Venus is visible in the lower right corner of the inverted telescope image.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Spectrohelioscope

The Spectrohelioscope is a telescope with a hydrogen-alpha filter. Sunlight is projected from the roof, through the filter, and can observe any wavelength of sunlight.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

The Spectrohelioscope

Looking into the spectrohelioscope projection, you see red light from hydrogen atoms. The black dot is Venus seen against the red colored Sun.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Transit of Venus

Ultra-high definition view of 2012 Venus Transit in the 304 Angstrom filter by the Solar Dynamics Observatory.
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Photo by: NASA/SDO, HMI / Caption by:

LA from above

Downtown Los Angeles is seen from the Griffith Observatory in the hills.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Venus Transit

NASA's Solar Dynamics observatory satellite captures the 2012 Venus transit on June 5, 2012.
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Photo by: NASA/SDO, HMI / Caption by:

Griffith Observatory lawn

The Hollywood sign visible in the background, the lawn at Los Angeles' Griffith Observatory was filled with hundreds of of people and telescopes there to observe the transit of Venus across the sun.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

The Sun through a No. 14 welder's glass filter

This cropped RAW photo was taken with a Canon 5DMKII and a 200mm lens at 4:14 p.m. PT through a No. 14 welder's glass filter at the Griffith Observatory.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

No. 14 welder's glass filter

This cropped RAW photo was taken with a Canon 5DMKII and a 200mm lens at 4:15 p.m. PT through a No. 14 welder's glass filter at the Griffith Observatory.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Griffith Observatory in the Los Angeles hills

The Griffith Observatory perched in the Los Angeles hills hosted hundreds of people to watch the transit of Venus Tuesday.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Deck at Griffith Observatory

Dozens of telescopes were brought out and people lined up to watch the transit of Venus from the Griffith Observatory Tuesday.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Projected image

A telescope projects an image of Venus passing between the Earth and the sun on Tuesday on the deck at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Looking skyward

People lined up to see the transit through telescopes on the deck at Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles onTuesday.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Starring at the Sun

Many spent the afternoon laying on the lawn at Griffith Observatory looking at the sun through filtered glasses.
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Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:
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