The main Control4 interface, showing all the areas you can control given the right equipment. At the demo at CEDIA, they controlled shades, lighting, AV, and an electronic lock via a regular-looking Sony remote (albeit with specific Control4 buttons). There's also tablet apps.
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Photo by: Geoffrey Morrison/CNET / Caption by:
The basic interface's modes.
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Photo by: Geoffrey Morrison/CNET / Caption by:
One of the subscreens, showing the electronic locking. You can have locks unlock or lock at specific times. The system can text or e-mail you when someone unlocks a door, or if someone doesn't unlock the door by a certain time.
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Photo by: Geoffrey Morrison/CNET / Caption by:
The basic user interface for the 2800 and 5800. If you don't opt for the $300 license fee, you get this interface. You can still control you AV gear and some lighting.
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Photo by: Geoffrey Morrison/CNET / Caption by:
The Control4/Sony remote. A more basic version ships with the receiver. There are also smartphone and tablet apps, which look pretty slick.
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Photo by: Geoffrey Morrison/CNET / Caption by:
The back panels of the 2800 and 5800 receivers.
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Photo by: Geoffrey Morrison/CNET / Caption by:
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