Rinspeed, a Swiss automotive design and conversion company, has a history of presenting far-flung concepts at the Geneva auto show. This year the company doesn't disappoint, offering up a car that can change its shape based on whether it will be used as a one or three seater.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
As an electric vehicle, the iChange needs to be light. Using composite materials for the body, the total weight for the concept is 1,050 kilograms, or about 2,315 pounds.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
Lacking doors, the canopy of the iChange opens up, allowing passengers to get in and out. The sides of the concept are low, so passengers can easily step in.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
In one seater configuration, the canopy sits at its lowest position in the back, making for less aerodynamic drag and optimal performance.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
If you have to carry passengers, the rear of the canopy can be set at a higher position with the push of a button, making the rear seats useful, but increasing drag.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
According to Rinspeed, the car can get to 62 mph in just a little more than four seconds with its 150 kilowatt lithium ion power pack. Top speed is 137 mph.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
Being an electric car, the controls are relatively simple, although its electric motor gets power to the wheels through a six-speed manual transmission sourced from Subaru.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
The instrument display shows a speedometer, with a battery level indicator at the center. Harmon Kardon provided the audio and navigation system for the car. This picture also indicates you can get Internet radio station Pandora.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
Instead of using a key with the iChange, you use an iPhone. Beyond merely starting the car, a custom iPhone application also controls things such as exterior lighting and signals.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
Rear seat passengers get the luxury of a screen for DVD or other video sources.
Updated:
Photo by: Rinspeed / Caption by:
Hot Galleries

Big stars on small screens

Smosh tells CNET what it took to make it big online

Internet sensations Ian Hecox and Anthony Padilla discuss how YouTube has changed and why among all their goals, "real TV" isn't an ambition.

Hot Products