The Honda Fit entered the market with a slew of new, inexpensive small cars, including the Nissan Versa and the Toyota Yaris. With its small engine, it works best as a city car or in dense suburban areas. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The Fit is designed for practicality, with a high roofline and a snub nose, creating maximum room for occupants and minimal room for the small engine. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The large headlight casings give the Fit a bugeye look. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
With a 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine producing 109 horsepower, the Fit doesn't have much push. It does all right below 30 mph, but its power curve decreases rapidly above that speed. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
With its high roof, there is plenty of room for occupants in both the front and back seats. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The Fit's flat back maximizes the rear cargo area. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
We were impressed with the amount of space in the cargo area. There is ample depth from the rear seats to the back hatch, and the rear seats can be folded down. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The cabin fit and finish shows expected Honda quality, with good choices for materials throughout. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The speedometer may go up to 140 mph, but that's merely wishful thinking. We struggled to get the Fit to 60 mph in less than 12 seconds. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The Fit showed responsive handling, although its high roofline gives it a high center of gravity. We would have also liked audio controls on the steering wheel. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
With the Sport version and the automatic transmission, you get these paddle shifters. We tried them out, but ultimately concluded they aren't really useful. They are also mounted to the steering wheel, were we prefer column-mounted paddles. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The Fit uses a five-speed automatic transmission. Its Sport mode merely keeps it from going above third gear. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
There is an auxiliary input at the bottom of the stack, complete with a 12-volt power point and a little box where you can keep your MP3 player. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The sole tech feature of the Fit, the stereo, features five EQ presets. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The single-disc player reads MP3 and WMA CDs and has a fairly good interface for navigating folders. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
The stereo displays ID3 tag information from MP3 tracks. You can choose to show artist, album, or track name. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
2.5 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
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