Outside Google i/o keynote

The crowd arrives for the developer confab Google I/O on Wednesday at Moscone West in San Francisco. Attendance was expected to be about 5,000 for the two-day conference.
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VP of Engineering Vic Gundotra takes the stage

VP of Engineering Vic Gundotra takes the stage saying Google I/O is about developers, innovation, and openness in the Web. "The Web belongs to all of us," Gundotra says.
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SpringSource

SpringSource demos a tool for determining whether the application performance holdup is on the server side, rather than the client side.
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Sundar Pichai

Sundar Pichai shows off the newly announced drag-and-drop features in Gmail, and a notifications API that allows users to receive Gmail alerts when not logged into Gmail.
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Sundar Pichai

Sundar Pichai, one of the architects of Chrome OS, discusses HTML5 on stage at Google I/O.
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Chrome

Chrome's cut of the browser market continues to grow, with currently more than 70 million active users.
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Web applications

Google shows the adoption of enterprise Web applications, with sales, accounting, and e-mail topping the list.
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Paul Maritz

Paul Maritz, president and CEO of VMware, talks about the Enterprise Web computing Google and VMware have been working on together.
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Roo

SpringSource's developer tool Roo is shown during a demo at Google I/O.
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Showing how the same app can be run on two very different computing devices, SpringSource pulls up an expense report application on an iPad.
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SpringSource

SpringSource demonstrates how the Google Web Toolkit integration can make for richer Web application development.
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Google i/o

Inside Moscone prior to the opening of Google I/O 2010, where HTML5, "Google TV," and Android were among the expected topics covered.
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HTML 5

HTML5 has been used by Opera, Safari, and Mozilla for years, but is quickly being adopted by more browsers, including, by the end of the year, Internet Explorer.
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HTML 5

Rich mobile Web applications are being created using HTML5 and adopted faster than others.
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Clicker TV

Clicker TV demonstrates its interface created with HTML5 elements Canvas and Webworkers, which enables simple browsing and filtering of video content based on genre or source.
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YouTube

Mike Shaver, vice president of engineering at Mozilla, demos WebM, showing the potential of HTML5 with YouTube videos.
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Dreamweaver

Dreamweaver incorporates HTML5, allowing the developer to see coding changes and the impact they have immediately alongside the code.
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Gaming

3D Lego Star is shown running on Native Client directly in the browser.
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Kevin Gibbs from Google App Engine

Kevin Gibbs announces Google App Engine for Business, which lets large businesses take advantage of Google's application-hosting infrastructure.
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