The 1.54-inch IPS display on the Omate TrueSmart shows off a variety of nice-looking watch faces. Yes, it's a watch...but that only scratches the surface of what this wrist-phone can do.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Apps in a grid, plus they can be put in folders. The TrueSmart Smartwatch 2.0 runs Android 4.2.2, and promises to run Google Play. Apps can be side-loaded just like on a full Android phone, too.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Two side buttons turn on the watch and act as a "home" button. In the middle, the lens for the 5 megapixel / 720p camera. Stealthy.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Android notifications pull down from the top just like you'd expect, but a lot of this watch's interface deviates from the Android norm.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
The sapphire crystal-covered IPS display looks crisp, but even at 240x240 resolution text can get awfully small to see. The dense metal body of the watch feels solid, and it's sealed to be water-resistant.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
A look at the camera lens. A rubber watchband with standard-style buckle attaches cleanly.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Another neat watch face Brian Bennett side-loaded from a supported Omate app: Pong.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Making a phone call once you pop in a SIM card: there's a built-in dialer and an address book. The speaker was loud, but the onboard microphone wasn't transmitting voice very well on our unit.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Sending a tweet and a snapshot on the TrueSmart via an installed full Twitter app. It takes an awful lot of patient hunt-and-pecking.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Typing is accomplished via an on-screen keyboard from Fleksy. It works, somewhat, but it seriously tried my patience. Big surprise, on a 1.5-inch screen. Alternative: you can actually pair a Bluetooth keyboard, like I did, and use it instead. Weird as heck, but effective.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
The back of the watch: it feels snug.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
The watch has no external ports: the SIM card slot is behind a screwed-in metal plate, and it charges via a external cradle with its own Micro USB port. The watch came with its own mini-screwdriver and extra screws.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
There's not a lot of free storage space on my test unit, it seems.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
At $249/$299 for versions with 4GB/8GB of storage, the Omate TrueSmart Smartwatch 2.0 is actually less expensive than the Samsung Galaxy Gear, and theoretically does a lot more as a stand-alone device. Even if impractical, it shows what wearable tech is capable of.
Updated:
Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
Hot Galleries

CNET's Holiday Gift Guide

Tablets that put your TV to shame

Binge-watch your favorite episodes on these portable screens.

Hot Products