Christening the Zumwalt

Bath Iron Works christened the first of the Navy’s next-generation Zumwalt-class destroyers over the weekend, breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the ship's bow at its Bath, Maine, shipyard.

The first in a class of three next-generation US Navy vessels, the DDG 1000 will take to the seas in 2014 with advanced capabilities.

The 610-foot-long ship comes equipped with new technologies including radar reflecting angles, a striking inward-sloping tumblehome hull, an all-electric integrated power system, and an advanced gun system.

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Photo by: Courtesy: Raytheon Company / Caption by:

Christening ceremony

The ship's co-sponsors, Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers, daughters of the ship's namesake, former Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo R. "Bud" Zumwalt Jr., broke a bottle of sparkling wine across the ship's bow this past Saturday at the shipyard.

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Breaking the bottle

The Navy had originally scheduled the christening of the future USS Zumwalt for October 19, 2013, but that ceremony had been canceled and postponed due to the federal government shutdown.

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The DDG 1000

Sleek and quiet, the design minimizes its radar signature, making it appear smaller than its actual size. The Total Ship Computing Environment has a simple, "sailor-centric" interface, says the Navy, allowing for a high degree of automation and a more effective and efficient combat experience.

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Raytheon-built equipment

Raytheon-built technologies and equipment integrated into the ship include the encrypted network  Total Ship Computing Environment, heavy-duty Electronic Modular Enclosure electronics units, the Integrated Undersea Warfare System -- two hull-mounted sonar arrays, and the MK57 Vertical Launching System -- a state-of-the-art weapon launcher designed to fire missiles for sea, land, and air attacks.

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A crowd gathers

The crowd on hand to enjoy the christening of the first Zumwalt-class destroyer.

Using sophisticated algorithms, the Zumwalt destroyers will be able to better detect, engage, and defeat an enemy threat.

The MK57 launching system's modular electronic-architecture allows Zumwalt destroyers to rapidly switch to new missiles systems by minimizing the need to requalify their launchers.

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Advanced weapons

Zumwalt's Advanced Gun System carries two 155mm guns capable of firing long-range projectiles that can strike a target from a distance of 63 nautical miles.

The Zumwalt also has been designed to support the US Navy's coming electromagnetic rail gun, expected to be deployed in 2016.

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Zumwalt-class destroyer

This exterior shot gives a good perspective on the sleek tumblehome design. Meanwhile, on the inside: The cutting-edge operating system developed by Raytheon is the first large-scale implementation of the US Navy's open-architecture strategy, designed to bind all Zumwalt onboard systems together.

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Photo by: Courtesy: Raytheon Company / Caption by:
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