Lamborghini Aventador J

Following up an insane supercar debut is easy, if you just follow this simple formula.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

Start with the car that you've already got. In this case, Lamborghini's engineers started with the 700-horsepower Aventador LP700-4, leaving its 6.5-liter V-12 engine intact and untouched.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

Next, grab a Sawzall and hack the top off...or have your team of industrial designers engineer an open-top variant, whichever method is easier for you.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

Normally, this is the point where you'll add some sort of retractable top, call the car a "concept," and trot your new model out at the next major car show wearing a coat of your fanciest paint.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

However, this is Lamborghini that we're talking about--and as we all know, the good folks at Lamborghini are a bit nuts.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

The automaker decided to skip adding a cloth or hard top and just leave its new open-air Aventador J's cabin exposed to the elements.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

And if that weren't mad enough, Lamborghini's designers also hacked off the windshield, necessitating a closed-faced helmet if you plan on coming close to the supercar's 217-mph top speed without a mouthful of bugs.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

Okay, so perhaps I'm oversimplifying the process. Lamborghini also made other changes to make the Aventador J look and feel cohesive. For example, the interior--if you can even call it that--features body-color matched paint.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

Up front, the nose benefits from new aerodynamic elements formed from carbon fiber to fit with the Aventador J's stripped-down racer aesthetic.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

Large side intakes feed the V-12 engine all of the oxygen that it needs for combustion and supply valuable air flow for cooling.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

You'd be forgiven for mistaking this rear wing for a fancy carbon fiber snowboard and rack.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

The rear end of the Aventador J is further optimized for cooling and aerodymanics. A quad-tipped exhaust likely makes a glorious noise.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

The headlamps and Y-shaped DRLs remain unchanged from the standard Aventador.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

I didn't think it was possible, but the roofless Aventador J appears even more poised to pounce than the already low-slung standard model.
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Lamborghini Aventador J

Here's the twist: I haven't even gotten to the craziest part. Lamborghini plans to sell has already sold this one-off example of the Aventator J for about 2.1 million euros.
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