All for customers

RENTON, Wash.--At Boeing's Customer Experience Center (CEC) here, airlines can view cabin mock-ups of the company's current aircraft and learn more about its products and services.

The CEC is located just south of Seattle and down the street from the company's customer training center. Also nearby is the Boeing's 737 manufacturing plant. Above the CEC's entrance is a circular map showing major cities of the world.

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787 Dreamliner

The 787's mock-up shows the aircraft's unique aesthetics. The high ceiling above the main cabin door is designed to minimize the transition between the airport and the enclosed space of the plane. The LED lighting can be changed as a flight progresses. For example, while brighter lighting would be used for mealtimes, boarding and initial descent, cruising altitude and rest periods would feature dimmer lighting.

We saw more concepts for 787 interiors last December when we visited the Dreamliner Gallery in Everett, Wash.

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Business class

This forward view of the business class cabin shows the comfortable seats with LCD screens. Above the middle row is a map showing the flight's route and progress.
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Baggage bins

Sloping baggage bins give a feeling of more space and headroom in the economy class cabin.
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Windows

The 787 will feature the largest passenger windows in the sky. During flight, most people will be able to see the horizon without leaning forward. The switch below the window adjusts the electronic shade, which lets passengers adjust the degree to which the window is dimmed.
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747-8

The mock-up of the next-generation 747-8 features a large business class cabin. Seats can feature adjustable reading lights, movable headrests, and multiple recline points.
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First class

The nose section of the mock-up hosts a sample first class cabin with lie-flat seats. At the rear is a self-service bar.
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Stairway

Unlike the current 747-400, the 747-8's upper deck stairway is slightly curved with a larger landing at the top.
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Flying in comfort

Besides a second business class cabin, the mock-up's upper deck has a sample lounge area.
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Privacy

There's also a concept for a private suite with a large seat and a bed.
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737

The 737 is Boeing's smallest aircraft. Though the ceiling is the same height as current 737s, the increased feeling of spaciousness is achieved through sloping luggage bins and new lighting.
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Passenger models

On one wall of the CEC are models of Boeing passenger aircraft. From the foreground are the 747, 777, 787, 767, and 737.
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787 Dreamliner

This 787 model shows the sharper nose and curved, upswept wings that make up the aircraft's distinctive profile. The 787 is the first major airliner to be built of composite materials.
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Freighter models

The CEC also shows off the company's freighter models. Clockwsise from top are the 777, 747, MD-11, 767, and 747.
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Sonic Criser

The Boeing Sonic Cruiser was a concept aircraft that would have flown at near supersonic speeds (Mach 0.98) at very high altitudes (40,000 feet or 12,000 meters). Boeing canceled the program in 2002 in favor of the 787.
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Take it for a spin

Though it's not a full simulator, airline customers can go for a virtual 787 flight.
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Fleet facts

They also can view stats on current Boeing aircraft in their fleets.
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All around the world

This display shows the 5,486 Boeing aircraft currently in the air at a given time.
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