The Visiobike is a carbon-fibre e-bike that links to your smartphone to make your commute safer by using the phone as a screen for a rear-view camera, a security lock and to send a distress message with GPS coordinates to an emergency contact if it detects a crash.

Visiobike is on IndieGogo now, looking for €180,000 in funding before 7 July.

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The frame is made entirely from carbon-fibre. It's so strong that it doesn't need a central column, which I think looks pretty cool.

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And really, who doesn't love carbon-fibre?

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The front forks are soft, giving a very smooth ride. You won't feel your arms jarred by small stones when cruising to work.

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The electric motor assists your pedalling up to a speed of 45km/h. The battery is housed inside the frame, rather than simply bolted on the outside somewhere.

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It's very smooth to ride and the motor assistance means you don't need to exert much effort to get going. It makes setting off from traffic lights that bit safer.

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It relies on connecting to your smartphone, which will be stuck to your handlebars. To even turn the motor on, you'll need to input your PIN.

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From the app, you can select how much assistance you want from the motor. I, being lazy, set it to maximum assistance.

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The app uses large icons that are easy to poke when you're riding along.

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It has a speedometer too. Try not to get into a competition with fellow cyclists.

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On the back of the saddle is a camera.

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It gives a rear-view of approaching traffic, meaning you can focus on the road ahead, rather than having to turn your head around when changing lanes.

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It has very responsive disc brakes on the front and back wheels.

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The gears are contained in the back wheel.

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The gears are automatic and use a system called NuVinci that uses spheres instead of cogs to provide a smooth transition of gears, rather than the clanking change you may be used to on regular bikes.

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Your speed and GPS are all fed back to your phone so you can map exactly where you've been and how fast you were.

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