BARCELONA, Spain -- We popped over to Fujitsu's booth at Mobile World Congress in sunny Spain to check out its augmented reality-equipped gloves and glasses, along with a cool motion tracking projector and more.

First up though, Rich Trenholm goes behind the wheel of some of Fujitsu's new car tech -- and loves it.

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This 'car' is equipped with voice recognition technology so you don't need to take your hands off the wheel to type directions into your phone.
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Presumably you won't need to consult a cheat sheet every time you want to get directions to the shops.
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Cunningly placed microphones pick up your voice and send it back to a dashboard phone.
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It'll allow you to view maps on the built in dashboard display.
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Barcelona is apparently a fashion hotspot. Rich is using Fujitsu's augmented reality specs.
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They have screens built in that show you the scene in front of you with digital information overlaid on top. It's designed for business use mostly -- oil workers for example can use the specs to see information about which pipeline to bash with a wrench or access digital manuals.
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This man introduced Rich to his finger -- there's a glove on it that allows him to write numbers in the air or confirm details about a project using various gestures, which will be sent back to head office instantly. With no writing or even emailing involved, Fujitsu hopes this glove will really speed up tasks.
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Rich has a go at messing with oil pipes using the glasses and gloves. Disaster was narrowly avoided.
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Already accomplished at pointing at things, this demo came naturally to Rich. The glasses would tell a technician exactly which component needs adjusting, while the gloves allow him to confirm quickly that all tests had been done.
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There's no denying that it's a pretty cool look.
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Elsewhere, this projector can track the movements of your hands, adding digital information over the top of documents.
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This is the way all holidays will be planned in the future.
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Rich showing off his crazy pointing skills again. Have some modesty, man. This time he's pointing at a tablet that has an advanced form of haptic feedback. It's designed to vibrate in certain areas more strongly in order to give an impression of texture to your fingers.
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Swipe your finger across this croc and you'll feel the vibrations become faster and more intense as you touch the more spikey scales.
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You can also feel the texture of sand.
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Speaking of sand, this tablet is impervious to sand dust. Here's a test model being slowly eroded like a cliff face.
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This one is waterproof.
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How do you test a phone's noise cancelling skills? Pop it in a sound-proof chamber with speakers, obviously!
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