AgustaWestland's Project Zero

AgustaWestland's Project Zero, among the electric aircraft designs shown at this year's Paris Air Show, is big enough for a single passenger.
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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:

Elektro E6 electric plane

EADCO and PC-Aero hope to build a prototype of this six-passenger aircraft, the Elektro E6, within three years and have it licensed for use within ten years. It'll have a range of 500km, the companies said.
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EADS E-Fan electric plane

The E-Fan is an all-electric demonstration aircraft that manufacturer EADS thinks will be good for quiet, zero-emission, cost-effective pilot training. The plane and passenger mass at takeoff maxes out at 550kg. It's got a takeoff speed of 68mph, cruising speed of 100mph, and and maximum speed of 137mph. But its range is fairly limited compared to conventionally fueled aircraft: it can fly only about 45 minutes to an hour.
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DA36 E-Star 2 hybrid plane

Diamond Aircraft's DA36 E-Star 2, built in cooperation with EADS and Siemens, isn't an electric aircraft, strictly speaking. But it uses battery-powered electric motors to power its engines; a conventional fuel engine charges the battery as the plane flies.
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E-Fan ducted electric fans

EADS' E-Fan has dual electric motors that produce a total power of 60 kilowatts. It's powered by lithium-ion polymer batteries. The ducting around the propellers increases their power, and the blades can be pitched at different angles for different circumstances.
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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:

Tekever AR1 police surveillance drone

Building an EV powerful enough to carry people is difficult, but not all aircraft have a human payload. Tekever's AR1 Blue Ray is designed to carry a camera for police. The company's bigger unmanned aerial vehicles use conventional liquid fuels.
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AgustaWestland's Project Zero

Here's another look at AgustaWestland's Project Zero, an all-electric tiltrotor.
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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:

AgustaWestland's Project Zero

The Project Zero rotors are mounted inside a black, circular frame that pivots within the wing.
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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:
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