Conventional JPEG vs. tone-mapped JPEG-HDR

Qualcomm demonstrated JPEG-HDR, a Dolby Laboratories technology for capturing and showing a better range of dark and light tones than ordinary cameras can handle, on an Android tablet at Mobile World Congress. The demo showed an image of a church interior; on the left is the ordinary JPEG image and on the right is Dolby's tone-mapped view constructed from multiple exposures ranging in brightness.
Updated:
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:

Human eye's dynamic range

Dolby explains that the human eye can capture 16 exposure values--measured here by F-stops--of dynamic range, which describes the span from light to dark in an image.
Updated:
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET; poster by Jonathan Kong/Dolby / Caption by:

The limits of cameras and conventional JPEG

A conventional digital camera (especially on a mobile phone) can capture a narrower dynamic range than a human eye. JPEG's 8-bit range can make matters worse, especially for those who want to edit an image.
Updated:
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET; poster by Jonathan Kong/Dolby / Caption by:

JPEG-HDR sales pitch

JPEG-HDR combines multiple exposures that capture a range of bright and dark values. Ordinary JPEG viewer software will see just a tone-mapped version boiled down from the HDR image, but Dolby's HDR software can explore the full range.
Updated:
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET; poster by Jonathan Kong/Dolby / Caption by:

Conventional JPEG vs. tone-mapped JPEG-HDR

Qualcomm demonstrated JPEG-HDR, a Dolby Laboratories technology for capturing and showing a better range of dark and light tones than ordinary cameras can handle, on an Android tablet at Mobile World Congress. The demo showed an image of a church interior; on the left is the ordinary JPEG image and on the right is Dolby's tone-mapped view constructed from multiple exposures ranging in brightness.
Updated:
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:

Look at the bright side

Using JPEG-HDR explorer software, a person can tap an area of an image to adjust exposure for that area. Here, the dim interior of the church is selected.
Updated:
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:

Stained-glass windows with JPEG-HDR

Using JPEG-HDR explorer software, a person can tap an area of an image to adjust exposure for that area. Here, bright stained-glass windows are selected, and the rest of the church interior fades away. All the data for the imagery is stored in a conventional JPEG image, but only Dolby's JPEG-HDR software can explore the full range.
Updated:
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET / Caption by:
Hot Galleries

Tech Tip

Stuck without Internet and want to watch movies?

CNET shows you how to download movies and TV shows onto your device using Amazon Prime so you'll always be entertained.

Hot Products