SVP Vic Gundotra gets the party started

SVP Vic Gundotra kicks off the day two keynote while sporting a snazzy pair of Google Glass specs.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Sundar Pichai talks Chrome

SVP of Chrome Sundar Pichai dishes news about Chrome.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

310 million users

According to Pichai, after launching only 3.5 years ago, Chrome already has 310 million active users.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Tab-syncing

For those who use Chrome on multiple devices, syncing of open tabs is a godsend.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Sync browser history across devices

What's more, even if you've closed a tab on one of your devices, you can reopen it on another via synced browser history.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Chrome for iPhone

Starting today, Chrome for iPhone is available in the App Store.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Chrome for iPad

And of course, the iPad gets Chrome too, bringing "silky smooth" tabs, syncing, and a nifty tab overflow solution (left-right swiping) to the megapopular tablet.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Clay Bavor takes us through Google Apps

Clay Bavor, Director of Product for Google Apps takes the stage to dish on the cloud-based collaboration platform, as well as on Google's Dropbox-like product Google Drive.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Drive across platforms

Google Drive is now available across the major computing platforms, plus Chrome OS.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Drive's advanced OCR technology on iOS

Bavor demonstrates how a user can pull text out of a registered mail receipt, add it to a database (somewhere in the cloud) and make it searchable, all using Google Drive's OCR technology. He later goes on to show how baked-in Google Goggles technology can do the same with images.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Google Docs goes offline

Starting today, Google Docs lets you edit your documents while offline. Changes are saved locally, then synced when you reestablish a connection. Unfortunately, though, this is only available for Documents, and not Spreadsheets or Presentations... yet.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Apps for Drive

Taking a peek at some of the apps available thanks to Google Drive SDK 2.0
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Chromebook

Another look at the newest Chromebook, Google's and Samsung's low-cost, mostly Web-based notebook computer.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Chromebooks hit Best Buy stores

Chromebooks will soon be hitting Best Buy stores across the U.S., making it a lot easier for the masses to adopt (or completely ignore) the nascent OS.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Urs Holzle introduces Google Compute Engine

SVP of Technical Infrastructure Urs Holzle unveils Google Compute Engine, basically a cloud-based supercomputer that runs in a software compartment.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Cores for your apps

With Google Compute Engine a developer can access over 770,000 cores worth of computing power to a specific app.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Native Client

Pichai demonstrates how a first-person shooter takes advantage of Native Client, Google's sandboxing technology, which lets programmers bring their C and C++ code to Chrome.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Parallax via HTML5

Joanne Fillion and Aubrey Anderson show off a stunning Cirque du Soleil browser app created completely in HTML 5. With an integrated webcam, a user moving his head side to side, would trigger CSS to move HTML elements around giving him a sense of parallax.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Chromebox giveaway

If all the Nexus swag wasn't already enough, everyone in attendance is also receiving a Chromebox.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

Glass demo: Behind the scenes

To close out the keynote, Sergey Brin gave attendees a behind-the-scenes look at yesterday's death-defying Google Glass demo. Not only that, he treated them to an encore.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:

The eagle has landed (again)

And just as it did yesterday, Glass-powered Google+ hangout in the sky ended with high-fives all around.
Updated:
Photo by: James Martin/CNET / Caption by:
Hot Galleries

Last-minute gift ideas

Under pressure? These will deliver on time

With plenty of top-notch retailers offering digital gifts, you still have time to salvage your gift-giving reputation.

Hot Products