On October 14, 1947, the Bell X-1 piloted by U.S. Air Force Capt. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, became the first airplane to fly faster than the speed of sound. The X-1 reached a speed of 700 miles per hour, Mach 1.06, at an altitude of 13,000 meters (43,000 feet). Yeager named the airplane "Glamorous Glennis" in tribute to his wife.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
The history of X planes begins with the X-1. It wasn't just the first in the lineage--it was the first aircraft ever to break the sound barrier. That flight occurred on October 14, 1947, with Chuck Yeager in the cockpit. The photo here shows the Bell Aircraft X-1-1 in flight, along with a snippet of the paper tape (which tracked the flight data) showing the jump to supersonic speed at Mach 1. The achievement was classified as top secret and the Air Force would not confirm the supersonic flight until March 1948.
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Photo by: NASA Photo / USAF photo by Lt. Robert A. Hoover / Caption by:
Another view of the Bell X-1 in flight.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
Charles E. Yeager, shown standing next to the Air Force's Bell-built X-1 supersonic research aircraft.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
Capt. Charles E. Yeager (shown standing in front of the Air Force's Bell-built X-1A supersonic research aircraft.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
The Bell X-1A in flight.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
Capt. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager transfers from a B-29 to the Bell X-1A.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
A Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1 series aircraft cockpit instruments display.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
Jackie Cochran and Chuck Yeager being presented with the Harmon International Trophies by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
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Photo by: Air Force Flight Test Center History Office / Caption by:
The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-2 with the Boeing B-29 launch ship behind.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:
Chuck Yeager in the cockpit of an NF-104, December 4, 1963.
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Photo by: U.S. Air Force / Caption by:

The actual X-1

This is the actual Bell X-1 that Chuck Yeager used to break the sound barrier for the first time in 1947.
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Photo by: Daniel Terdiman/CNET / Caption by:
Honoring Yeager's achievement, a statue of him stands in a small park at Edwards Air Force Base. The engraving reads, "Sound Barrier Cracked. On October 14, 1947, 42,000 feet above this monument, Captain Chuck Yeager, USAF, piloting a Bell X S-1 rocket airplane named 'Glamorous Glennis,' became the first person to exceed Mach 1. With this flight, the era of supersonic aviation was born."
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Photo by: Daniel Terdiman/CNET / Caption by:
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