The Casio G'zOne Ravine 2 won't win any beauty contests, but its superdurable design is built to last. You'll notice the burly, comfortable feel in your hand.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
The Ravine 2 is designed to withstand a variety of harsh elements, including a full dunking in water.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
One of the best things about the Ravine 2's design is the spaciousness of its navigation controls and keypad.
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Indeed, the keys are very comfortable to use. But that's only if you remember how to text on an alphanumeric keypad.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
The external display shows the usual information, though it would be nice to be able to see some internal menus without opening the phone. The black-and-red color scheme is very Verizon.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
The Ravine 2's moving parts are neither too stiff nor too loose.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
The Ravine 2's camera and flash are located on its top rear side. Photo quality is poor, unfortunately, and there's no self-portrait mirror.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
The battery cover has a locking switch to keep out water and dust.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
Similarly, the Micro-USB and microSD ports on the right side are protected by rubber flaps.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
On the left side are the push-to-talk control, the volume rocker, and a voice commands button. The headset jack up top also has a cover, though it's too bad that the jack is 2.5mm, rather than 3.5mm.
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Photo by: Josh Miller / Caption by:
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