PowerShot A800

The A800 is a new low for Canon. In price, I mean. Its estimated retail price is $89.99. As expected, at that price you don't get a lot of bells and whistles, but it's not a poorly spec'd camera, either.
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PowerShot A800

The camera's basic specs include 10 megapixels, has a 3.3x f3-5.8 37-122mm-equivalent lens, and a 2.5-inch LCD. It's powered by AA-size batteries.
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PowerShot A800

The controls are nice and large and easy to read. Shooting modes are geared for automatic users, and it records videos at 640x480-pixel resolution. You do, however, get a couple of Canon's creative modes: Super Vivid and Poster Effect. Also, its macro mode can focus as close as 0.4 inch from your subject, so assuming the photo quality is as good as previous entry-level A-series cameras, this should make for an inexpensive way to shoot close-ups.
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PowerShot A3300 IS

The $179.99 A3300 IS is at the top end of the A series. It's a 16-megapixel compact with a 5x f2.8-5.9 28-140mm-equivalent lens and a 3-inch LCD. It's powered by a lithium ion rechargeable battery.
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PowerShot A3300 IS

It's actually very thin compared with previous A-series models. I like the large mode dial on top that's clearly labeled. By the way, that Live setting is for the new Live View Control that lets you make brightness, color, and tone adjustments to photos using easy-to-understand controls.
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PowerShot A3300 IS

The buttons might be a little tricky to press for some, but overall the design is nice.
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PowerShot A1200

The $109.99 A1200 marks the return of an optical viewfinder to the A-series lineup. Canon is currently the only major camera manufacturer with an OVF on an entry-level camera.
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PowerShot A1200

The feature set is pretty remarkable for a $110 camera. Outside of the OVF, this 12-megapixel camera has a 28mm-equivalent wide-angle lens with a 4x zoom, a 2.7-inch LCD, 720p HD movie capture, and it's powered by AA-size batteries. About the only thing it's missing is image stabilization.
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PowerShot A1200

The OVF is small, but it's better than nothing when you want to save power, be more discreet with your shooting, or you're out in bright sunlight.
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PowerShot A2200

The $139.99 A2200 is similar in specs and shooting features to the A1200. The resolution goes up to 14 megapixels and it uses a lithium ion rechargeable instead of AA batteries, but the lens, screen, and modes are the same. However, it doesn't have an optical viewfinder.
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PowerShot A2200

Switching to a rechargeable battery and dropping the OVF allows for a slimmer, smaller body. What's nice is that this camera doesn't feel like a budget camera.
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PowerShot A2200

I forgot to take a shot of the front of the A2200, but this is what it looks like. All of the new models come in multiple color options. The A2200, for example, comes in blue, black, silver, and red.
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