Cover me

Production company iam8bit recently teamed with Poster Posse -- a site that showcases artists riffing on popular culture -- to mount a show called "Conspiracies, Monsters and Mythology: An X Files Art Show." The exhibit is on display at iam8bit's Los Angeles gallery through February 14 and features more than 30 artists' takes on "The X-Files," which is now in the middle of its six-episode reboot.

This piece, painted by Nicolas Bannister, imagines what an "X-Files" comic book cover would look like.

Anyone who can't attend the actual show in LA can purchase prints through iam8bit's website for surprisingly affordable prices here.

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Photo by: Nicolas Bannister / Caption by:

Flukeman

"The curation for the show was a collaborative effort between iam8bit and Poster Posse," iam8bit spokesman Michael Saltzman told CNET's Crave blog. "We worked together to choose artists that we knew were 'X-Files' fanatics, but also had independently unique and trademark styles. Since the show is so very often dark and moody, it was important to us to open the collection of art up to varying interpretations, conveying both the creepy vibes as well as some more whimsical ones. Because 'X-Files' does have comic chops as well."

This image of Flukeman, one of the more gruesome-looking creatures from the show, was painted by Rich Davies. The Flukeman was a worm-like parasitic humanoid that appeared in the "X-Files" episode "The Host" on September 23, 1994.

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Photo by: Michael Saltzman / Caption by:

Smoking alien

Austin James, the painter of this smoking alien, says his inspiration for the piece came from the "Jose Chung's From Outer Space" episode that aired on April 12, 1996. In that installment of the series, the alien appears on the cover of a book written by science fiction novelist Jose Chung. He (it?) also shows up locked in a cell elsewhere in the episode muttering, "This is not happening."

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Photo by: Austin James / Caption by:

Dee's bees

"I was inspired by the first film, 'X-Files: Fight the Future,' for my piece," Dee Chavez, the creator of this image, told CNET. "I played with the idea of not having control over your body and mind -- an alien abduction with the idea of a beehive hierarchy, where the worker bees (Mulder and Scully), no matter how much they struggle, are unaware of the master plan."

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Photo by: Dee Chavez / Caption by:

Smoking man

"I wanted my piece to focus on the man we all love to hate," artist Doaly said when asked about this image. "The man in the shadows, the puppeteer that controls our every move without us knowing. The cigarette-smoking man."

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Photo by: Doaly / Caption by:

Searching

"It is all about searching, and picking the right direction to start that search," said Mark Borgions, who created this image showing a stylized Mulder and Scully using their trademark flashlights to search for the truth (which, as any "X-Files" fan knows, is out there somewhere).

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Photo by: Mark Borgions / Caption by:

Scary stuff

"I've always liked the mythology of the colonizing, black-oil aliens," said Anna Bhari, who painted this Scully set on a field of the black oil that was a recurring theme throughout the nine-season run of the show.

"I remember the first time I saw the special effect of the eyes full of black oil as a kid, I was on the top bunk in my stepbrother's room, and it scared the crap out of me!"

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Photo by: Anna Bhari / Caption by:

Sneaky

"I was never allowed to watch 'The X-Files' as a kid, but I snuck in a few episodes," said artist, who simply goes by the name Nikkolas. "Now that I'm a 30-year-old sci-fi fan, I wanted my 'Dana & Fox' piece to embody all the wonder and awe I had during those illegal, 10-year-old-kid viewing parties."

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Photo by: NIKKOLAS / Caption by:

X-phile

"As a longtime X-phile and gamer, I wanted to create a fun mashup using the moody essence of the show, combined with the style of Monument Valley and Crystal Castles," said artist Harlan Elam, referring to the games that inspired this work. "The isometric style allowed me to build a game landscape out of the X and to place Easter eggs from the show throughout the piece."

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Photo by: Harlan Elam / Caption by:

Tithonus

"My piece was inspired by the episode 'Tithonus,' which is an interesting episode because the monster/villain in the episode turns out to be a tragic victim himself," said artist Kelly Moore, who painted this bloody image. "He is so closely connected to, and surrounded by, death and yet not responsible for it."

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Photo by: Kelly Moore / Caption by:

Cute and colorful

"When you think of 'The X-Files,' you think of flashlights in the dark, with guns and badges and pantsuits," said the painter of this image, Nan Lawson. "I wanted to do something different, something cute and colorful and fun, so I was inspired by a big, puffy, colorful jacket that Scully wears in the episode 'Darkness Falls.'"

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Photo by: Nan Lawson / Caption by:

Little "bit" of Mulder

"I always got a kick out of it when Mulder was frantically calling after Scully, when it was usually Mulder in need of help, he just didn't know it yet," said artist Alex Griendling. "So I decided to filter that scenario through the pixelated aesthetic of 1993 video games, the year 'X-Files' debuted."

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Photo by: Alex Griendling / Caption by:

I want to believe

"My piece is inspired by the characters and dark tone of the show," said Sylvia Liu, who created this image showcasing a phrase that pops up quite a bit in the new season.

"I wanted to convey the eeriness and creepiness, with a quieter and minimal approach of the iconic UFO poster projected on Scully and Mulder while they're looking back at you. I was going for a 'what's going to happen next?' kind of vibe."

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Photo by: Sylvia Liu / Caption by:
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