Google introduces hackable hardware

Google's new Android Device Kit, or ADK, will let you create custom hardware peripherals that you can control from an Android device.
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Flora by Android

The ADK shown here has been customized with a second Arduino board to control a hydroponic grow system (not pictured.)
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Your phone versus Megatron

This robotic shell designed by Hasbro uses the ADK to create an interface that turns the smartphone into a robotic toy that can be altered by doing nothing more than downloading a new app.
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Man-sized Labyrinth

This enormous version of Labyrinth is controlled with a Motorola Xoom tablet hooked up to an ADK by USB.
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Bigger doesn't mean easier

The Labyrinth gameplay used the Xoom's built-in gyroscope to control the game board, and it took most people a while to get used to making small corrections in the Xoom's orientation to make it past the first hole.
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One labyrinth, size large

The scale of the game made it difficult to advance, but some people did. Here, the ball has almost reached the end of the maze.
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iRobot, you Jane

This may look like an immobile stand with a Xoom on top, but in fact it's a moving robot that uses the tablet's camera and an ADK to avoid bumping into people on the busy convention floor.
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The TurtleBot

Willow Garage's TurtleBot is aimed at the hobby market, and can be trained to perform different tasks. Originally, it used a Kinect sensor, but the model here that's following around a Google I/O attendee runs on Android with the ADK. Although the current ADK is limited to USB connections, it will soon support Bluetooth, says Google.
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More than robots

The ADK is used here by Yoshinari Yoshikawa, founder and CEO of Miselu, a Silicon Valley-based company that is working with keyboard maker Yamaha to develop automated piano controls with Android and the ADK.
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