Mission to Mars

A view of Mars as seen through Microsoft's Worldwide Telescope software.

Microsoft has made a number of improvements to its Worldwide Telescope project, including partnering with NASA to offer much better imagery of the planet Mars. The addition of Mars imagery is one of several changes to the telescope that Microsoft is showing off Monday at its annual Faculty Summit meeting with outside researchers.

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Photo by: Microsoft / Caption by:

Peaks and Valles

View of Valles Marineris, using wide-angle imagery from NASA's Viking orbiters and the Mars Orbiter Camera.
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Photo by: Courtesy of Microsoft/NASA / Caption by:

Swiss cheese

Surface details of Mars showing the planet's Swiss cheese-like circular depressions.
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Photo by: Courtesy of Microsoft/NASA / Caption by:
Tracks of the Mars rover Opportunity are visible just north of the red planet's Victoria Crater.
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Photo by: Courtesy of Microsoft/NASA / Caption by:

Telescope improvements

This image shows the full sky view in the old version (left) and improved version (right).
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Photo by: Courtesy of Microsoft/NASA / Caption by:

The old version

A close-up of the old version of the Worldwide Telescope image clearly shows the seams between images.
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Photo by: Courtesy of Microsoft/NASA / Caption by:

The new version

Here, in the new version, seams between images are much less visible.
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Photo by: Courtesy of Microsoft/NASA / Caption by:
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