Jaguar's XJ Supersport is a limited-edition model, the most powerful Jag in the current lineup. It is also available in a long wheelbase version. Below it sit the XJ Supercharged and the standard XJ.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Much of the front of the XJ Supersport reflects traditional Jaguar styling, especially the wire grille. The hood is a little bulky, a cue inherited from the Ford era.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The XJ Supersport gets a direct-injection supercharged 5-liter V-8 that makes 510 horsepower, kicking the car up to 60 mph in an exhilarating 4.7 seconds.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Jaguar gives the XJ Supersport uniquely designed wheels.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The design of the new XJ is somewhat controversial, with its roofline running back, fastback-style, to the trunk lid.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The blacked-out C pillars blend into the rear window. Jaguar likens the back profile to sunglasses.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
With an active suspension, the XJ Supersport corners better than a car this big should, but can get a little sloppy as the stress increases.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The trunk is small compared with other big sedans.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Dual sunroofs let in light for front and rear passengers.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Jaguar fits the interior with fine wood and leather, but allows more plastic for the switchgear than is seen on the XF model.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The steering has a luxury feel, making it easy to maneuver the car, but it remains overpowered in high-speed driving.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
As has become standard in Jaguar models, the drive selector is a dial.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The LCD instrument cluster gains a red hue when the car is switched into competition mode.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The LCD panel allows for different types of information displays, such as this seatbelt diagram over the tachometer.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Jaguar fits directional controls on the steering-wheel spokes, making them useful for a variety of functions.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The main menu screen on the interface is a little bland, but it offers easy access to navigation, audio, and climate control.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The navigation system shows some 3D details on its maps, and also includes traffic information.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
This audio interface is a little bit busy, but it is well-organized.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The iPod and separate USB ports sit in the center console, which features a royal-purple lining.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The iPod interface offers typical music library browsing.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The infotainment system can play video from a variety of sources, but only when the car is stopped.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Audio sources include iPod, USB, and Bluetooth streaming, along with the car's own hard drive.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The Bowers and Wilkins audio system produces exceptional sound quality.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The phone system offers contact list access, and makes it possible to dial numbers through voice command by saying a contact's name.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The phone book interface requires an initial letter search. We prefer systems that initially open a browser window, giving you instant access to the contact list.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The rearview camera includes trajectory lines that show where the car will go depending on wheel turn.

Back to review.

Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Hot Galleries

Latest in tech news

What is Net neutrality?

Learn about the debate over Internet traffic equality and why it matters.

Hot Products