Zyxel joins wireless display club with WiHD-based Aerobeam kit

Zyxel announces its first wireless display kit, the Aerobeam WHD6215 that's based on the WirelessHD standard.

Zyxel's Aerobeam WirelessHD WHD6215 wireless display kit
Zyxel's Aerobeam WirelessHD WHD6215 wireless display kit Zyzel

D-Link's recently available MainStage would make a great accessory for those with an Intel WiDi-enabled laptop. But if you have another laptop or want to connect any HDMI-enabled devices to your big HDTV screen, the Aerobeam WirelessHD (WiHD) kit, model WHD6215, that Zyxel introduced today will make a better investment.

This is the first wireless display product the networking vendor has introduced. Similar to the D-LinkMainStage and the Netgear Push2TV , the WHD6215 allows you to wirelessly connect devices, such as a laptop or a DVD player, to a big-screen TV.

While the MainStage is based on Intel's WiDi wireless display standard, ZyXEL's WHD6215 Kit is based on the WiHD technology standard , which is again based on the 60GHz wireless networking standard, similar to that of wireless routers.

WirelessHD technology is capable of providing multigigabit data rates, making streaming multiple HD content possible. Zyxel says the kits offer wireless streaming up to full 1080p HD, including 3D content and audio up to 7.1 surround sound. The WHD6215 receiver can also work with up to four transceivers at a time, meaning it can connect up to four devices to one TV simultaneously.

The kit will work with any device that would normally use an HDMI cable and doesn't have built-in support for WirelessHD. All you have to do is plug the transceiver to the player and the receiver to the TV using the HDMI ports, and you're good to go. The two devices can stay connected wirelessly from up to 10 meters (about 33 feet) away.

The WHD6215 will be available in early July with an estimated street price of around $200. The kit includes one transceiver and one receiver.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews 3D printers, networking/storage devices, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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