Zeiss debuts cine-friendly ultrawide, tele lenses

Prime lenses with 15mm and 135mm focal lengths join Carl Zeiss' CP.2 lineup of crossover lenses that can be used on video, cine, or SLR cameras.

The Carl Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2 15/T2.9
The Carl Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2 15/T2.9 Carl Zeiss

Carl Zeiss today announced 15mm and 135mm members in its CP.2 family of adaptable lenses geared for both cinema and SLR uses and due to ship in the fourth quarter.

The CP.2 line of Compact Prime lenses can be fitted with adapters to Canon or Nikon SLRs, to PL-mount cameras common in the video and cinema industry, Micro Four Thirds cameras from Olympus and Pansonic, or Sony's NEX cameras with E-mount lenses. The CP.2 line is geared for cinema purposes, though, for example with a long-travel focusing ring.

The lens family spotlights the convergence of traditional photography and video markets. Led by Canon's 5D Mark II three years ago, SLRs have become widely used in many video applications. The new 5D Mark III is expected to continue the trend with even better low-light shooting abilities that can make it faster to set up scenes that otherwise would require more lighting. And the Nikon D800 has high-quality HDMI output and appears to capture sharper video than the Canon rival, according to some early testing by Dan Chung of Dslrnewsshooter.com.

The Compact Prime CP.2 15/T2.9 weighs 900g, and the Compact Prime CP.2 135/T2.1 weighs 1.6kg. Both are scheduled to ship in the fourth quarter for $5,700.

The German lensmaker announced the lenses in conjunction with the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) show in Las Vegas.

The Carl Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2 135/T2.1
The Carl Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2 135/T2.1 Carl Zeiss
About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Looking for an affordable tablet?

CNET rounds up high-quality tablets that won't break your wallet.