YouTube streamlines its video uploader, bumps size limits

YouTube's aging video uploader is given a handy refresh that increases file size limits and lets you upload up to 10 videos at a time.

Over the weekend YouTube quietly began testing a new uploading tool for users to publish their videos. The tool now allows users to begin plugging in information fields about the video while the upload is happening, much like Viddler, Vimeo, and others have offered for years. The company is testing the new player with a small number of its users, although you can access it with a special link.

The new uploader lets you edit data while the video is uploading. (Click to enlarge.) CNET Networks

The company has also increased the size limit of uploaded video files from 100MB to 1GB. This should open things up dramatically for people who are shooting in high-quality VGA video mode on their digital cameras, something that can turn a one-minute video capture into files that would have exceeded the previous limits.

The updated uploader also now lets users upload multiple video files at once. You can either do this when selecting the file, or while any previous videos are in the process of being uploaded. The tool allows for up to 10 videos a time, which means you can start up additional clips as soon as older ones have made it through. Doing so does not interrupt whatever file is currently uploading, which is a nice touch.

Two things that have not changed with the uploading process are the video time limits and long processing times, both of which are the same. Videos are capped at 10 minutes, and you still have to wait longer than your video's length for the system to process your video for viewing. As for the processing, there's nothing you can do, however, if you want to get longer-form videos on the service you can try your luck at becoming a YouTube partner which lifts the cap.

Related: YouTube sucks: 4 sites that do video better

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About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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