Your DRM-free theme is going to cost you

The Skins Factory is trying to give its users a new experience when installing desktop themes. It has announced that its Windows desktop-theme software, Hyperdesk, is now DRM-free.

This Wall-e-themed desktop looks at my system resources with flirtatious eyes. The Skins Factory

I used to be a huge fan of Windows desktop themes. Granted, this was over 10 years ago, when I knew little about computers and was ignorant of the amount of system resources themes consumed. I don't use them today, as I prefer to keep my system clean and optimized, but I still understand the appeal. Customizing your desktop with a new theme makes for a new experience.

The Skins Factory is trying to give its users a new experience when installing desktop themes. It has announced that its Windows desktop-theme software, Hyperdesk, is now DRM-free. According to the company, Hyperdesk had been using third-party software to handle its license key activations. Now however, all Hyperdesk themes sold on its site will no longer require a key.

This means a few things for Hyperdesk users. First, they will be able to install Hyperdesk on their personal systems an unlimited number of times. Second, no longer is an Internet connection required to install Hyperdesk. Third, according to The Skins Factory, "refunds will be more strict due to the lack of ability to deactivate license keys." And finally fourth, the price of all Hyperdesk themes have been increased from $9.95 to $14.95.

Jeff Schader, CEO of the company, states, "I absolutely understand the train of thought that many software publishers have about protecting their investment and products. On the other hand, as a consumer, I personally feel that DRM normally just ends up punishing honest users, while those who would steal the software have far less restrictions than legitimate end-users."

I agree. So, that begs the question: then why are you punishing consumers by raising your prices? Just seems weird to me that the company would talk about looking out for its customers and then turn around and hit them with a 50 percent price increase.

I have no idea what these new costs cover, but talk about having the other shoe dropping with an immediate and hard crash.

 

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