WWW2008 - Social media in 2020 to be pervasive, ambient

A panel of social media experts believe that in 2020, social media will be far more pervasive, interlinked, and location-aware than they are now. Here are my comments as published on Twitter, with some comments following.

A panel of social media experts believe that in 2020, social media will be far more pervasive, interlinked, and location-aware than they are now. Here are my comments as published on Twitter, with some comments following. (Reverse chronological order)

  • David Shamma brings up what I've been wondering: What about security?
  • Questioner answers vegetarian question by calling for show of hands. Old tech, hurrah!
  • Marc Davis thinks in 2020, we'll have ambient data about stuff like who around us is vegetarian when we travel
  • And David Shamma thinks it's more problematic: we need to manage different audiences.
  • Marc Davis thinks it'd be a good idea to have all the stuff people here are typing centrally available...
  • Lada Adamic - in 2020 you'll feel comfortable with a perfect stranger on your couch
  • Marc Davis from Yahoo is talking about geotagging, predicts social media in 2020 will be heavily mobile.

This session is quite optimistic. David Shamma's attempt to bring up the risks of increasingly pervasive information networks such as security, privacy, and I'll add insanity, did not exactly take root. He's concerned too about the flood of information, something that gets you "zombied, or chickened, or whatever else." "Maybe we should call for people to prune their social networks a little bit, rather than grow them," he added.

Shamma also brings up an audience-side perception of a problem that I've encountered working in the nonprofit world: How do we make sure that we only send out event notifications to people who are still where they said they were at registration. Clearly, tying things into some locative status update would solve this, but I think the privacy implications there are very important.

I'll add more if there's more.

Other posts from WWW2008 are here, and I'm Twittering here.

About the author

    Formerly a journalist and consultant in Beijing, Graham Webster is a graduate student studying East Asia at Harvard University. At Sinobyte, he follows the effects of technology on Chinese politics, the environment, and global affairs. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network, and is not an employee of CNET. Disclosure.

     

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