Would you wear a TV?

Check out the latest in wearable displays.

The TV vest originally evolved from the video coat, as seen here. David Forbes

David Forbes is a man with a fashionable vision.

After completing a working video coat with a mega assortment of color LEDs, Forbes has moved onto a smaller, slightly more practical application: an LED TV vest.

The $20,000 array is no slouch, using custom-made circuit boards that pump nearly 5 gigabits of data to 14,400 red, green, and blue LEDs.

Surveillance video technology limits the resolution of the video so content is watchable on the flexible vest, which displays content at 160x120. Battery life clocks in around 90 minutes, and runs off lithium-polymer batteries commonly used for remote control hobby vehicles.

A wearable TV sounds like something from Daft Punk's latest fashion line.

The evolution of a wearable TV is a fascinating journey into the impractical imagination of Forbes, an electrical engineer who resides in Arizona. In his video coat manifesto, one quickly learns that the true inspiration for these unique displays is one of the biggest and brightest events in the U.S.: The Burning Man Festival.

About the author

Crave contributor Christopher MacManus regularly spends his time exploring the latest in science, gaming, and geek culture -- aiming to provide a fun and informative look at some of the most marvelous subjects from around the world.

 

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