Would you read an e-book on a phone?

When it comes to reading, I'd stake my eyesight on e-ink and a bigger display over a LCD screen on a handset. What about you?

Reading habits

Would you read an e-book on a phone/iPod Touch?

Kindle 3
Sarah Tew/CNET

I spent last weekend with the Amazon Kindle 3 and Apple iPhone 4, bought recently as part of my retail-therapy fix.

One's an e-book reader with an experimental WebKit browser built in. The other's a smartphone popular with kids, grannies, and just about everybody in between. Both mobile devices serve distinctly different purposes, but there's at least one overlapping feature: electronic books.

So far, I'm convinced I've made the right decision to go with the Kindle for reading. The 6-inch e-ink screen looks eerily like real paper and is easier on the eyes than a traditional LCD. The size is also just right to hold with one hand, although the leather case I bought added considerable heft. The display isn't a touch screen, though a couple of colleagues automatically starting swiping on it.

Of course, I have more to say about the e-reader, which I'll save for another day. But with the Kindle, I've joined the growing league of multi-device-toting consumers, a necessary sacrifice since I find it tiring to read on a small display like the iPhone's.

Obviously, I haven't tried all the e-readers in the market to compare the differences . However, I'd stake my eyesight on e-ink and a bigger display over a LCD screen on a handset. What about you?

(Source: Crave Asia)

 

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