Woman says she was fired via Twitter (before starting job)

Technically Incorrect: A woman is about to work in a pizza restaurant. The night before her first day, she describes it as a "F*** A**" job." Naturally, her new employer finds out.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


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Cella retweeted this tweet, the one that she says ended her pizza career. Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Here at Technically Incorrect, we dispense advice in bite-sized morsels.

Who are we to know what people should do? However, we have a fair inkling that the night before you start a new job, it's probably best not to tweet that it's a "F*** A** job."

I only mention this because of a new Internet celebrity called Cella. True, she's likely to be an old Internet celebrity in a few hours. Currently, though, she's receiving quite a bit of support on her Twitter feed, after she was fired from her job.

As the Irish Daily Mirror reported, Cella was offered that job by Robert Waple. He's the boss at Jet's Pizza in Mansfield, Tx.

The night before she was to start, February 6, she emitted a tweet that read: "Ew, I start this f*** a** job tomorrow." This plaintive cry from the wilderness of reality was accompanied by seven thumbs-down emoji.

Some might wonder whether this job wasn't the most wonderful. However, Twitter is unerringly public. Who can be surprised that one of her future co-workers spotted her bons-mots and passed them on to her future employer? Who immediately became her non-employer.

Waple took to his own Twitter account -- one he'd barely used since 2009 -- and replied: "And...no you don't start that FA job today! I just fired you! Good luck with your no money, no job life!"

Both Waple's and Cella's tweets have since been deleted. However, Cella, reportedly a teen, has retweeted messages with Waple's original tweet in them. Moreover, she also tweeted that she got fired over Twitter.

On her Twitter feed, people aren't merely sympathizing, but suggesting that she hire a lawyer because, in their view, this was an unfair dismissal.

I have contacted both Waple and Cella to hear their slices of the story and will update, should I hear.

Clearly, some emotions coursed through this tale. I'm not sure that getting fired from a pizza shop will necessarily result in a "no money, no job life."

There again, making a little food, taking orders and eating free pizza would have been the rudiments of her job. As Waple himself, according to the New York Daily News, tweeted: "How hard would that have been?"

And so another day goes by when social media turns up a vivid exchange that, in a world that used to be private, would have been solely among friends.

Still, as quite a few posters to Cella's Twitter feed have excitedly pointed out: she's now famous.

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It's seems like a loving place, doesn't it? Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET
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