With touch-screen technology, Jell-O sings a song

Two French industrial-design students create "Noisy Jelly," a toy that uses capacitive sensing to make gelatin into an instrument.

© 2012 by Raphael Pluvinage and Marianne Cauvard

If Jell-O could sing, what sort of a delicious opera might come about?

Working with technology that's used in touch screens, two French design students have created a toy that playfully answers that question.

With "Noisy Jelly," kids (or abnormally sound-obsessed adults ) mix up some gelatin, add a little "musical coloring," pour it in a mold, place the resulting forms on a special board, and then "play" the jelly with their fingertips (as you'll see in the video below).

Raphael Pluvinage and Marianne Cauvard are two students in their last year at ENSCI, the Ecole Nationale Superieure de Creation Industrielle -- the only French national institute exclusively devoted to industrial design.

They explain that "technically, the game board is a capacitive sensor, and the variations of the shape [of the jelly] and their salt concentration, the distance and the strength of the finger contact are detected and transform into an audio signal." (For more details on how the toy works, check out this PDF.)

Pluvinage and Cauvard also say the "product" shown in the video is a fully operational prototype and that the sound has not been manipulated for the clip.

That's enough for us -- if this thing were to ever hit the market, we'd consider buying it for the kiddies (or, being abnormally sound-obsessed adults, for ourselves).

True, it may not be as jaw-dropping as an electronic, music-producing, stuffed badger . But it would probably taste a lot better.

NOISY JELLY from Raphaël Pluvinage on Vimeo.

(Via Laughing Squid)

 

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