Wildscreen TV lets video creators cash in, not sell out

Wildscreen TV is a new video-hosting service with a great player and a generous revenue-sharing policy.

Wildscreen TV is a video host for film or clip makers who want to make some money off their work without having to build their own sites. Content creators who put up their videos get 100 percent of the ad revenue and access to a great video player that converts source footage into DVD-resolution streams. It's not as pretty as some of the "HD" quality streams from providers like Vimeo, DailyMotion, or Motionbox, but if your source content is good it looks simply fantastic.

As with other broadcast video hosts, content creators can make their own channels. What's especially cool is that the entire page can be skinned to the creator's liking. When used correctly you can achieve similar results to some of the special branded pages on YouTube that advertisers and companies are paying to get. Also, the advertising is completely customizable, and you can bring in ad units from Google, Amazon, AdBright, and eBay.

Wildscreen TV is quite file friendly, which I'm a fan of. It'll take any length and any size of video that you can throw at it with ease. The uploader supports multiple files at once and gives you plenty of stats along the way, such as how much time is left and the total percentage of how far it's gone. Both the 12MB and 150MB test videos I uploaded were processed and showed up on my video list in less than two minutes, which is phenomenal.

Wildscreen is off to a great start. The quality of the player and the generous hosting options offer a lot more than some big name video-hosting services. I also like that it's open to several advertising options--which means you won't have to sign up for something new if you've got a system you're already using.

I've embedded a sample video below. To see the video page, click here.

Tags:
Software
About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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