Wikiphonia: A headphone wiki

Headphones have been around long before "i" and "Pod" got together. Wikiphonia is a fantastic resource for headphone history, technology, and related information.

Grado's GS-1000 features solid mahogany earcups. Steve Guttenberg

Headphone lovers of the world unite! We now have our own wiki, Wikiphonia.

Headphones are hugely popular now, but they were around long before "i" and "Pod" ever got together. The history is long and deep, and Wikiphonia is a fantastic resource for anyone who wants to know more about headphone technology and related information.

Headphone geeks are a breed apart from audiophiles as I know them, but they're an even more intense bunch. One of the great things about headphonia is you can get in pretty deep without a big investment. Hard-core types like to build their own headphone amplifiers.

Wikiphonia has an entry that covers 1970s era USSR copies of Western headphone technologies and designs, "The copying was done out in the open, probably and correctly, they figured no one would start a conflict with a superpower over a few headphone patents."

For me, it all started with Sennheiser's HD 414. Its bright yellow earpads were super cool, and the sound was awesome. Back in the early 1970s it was a really big deal, a giant leap better than anything I'd ever heard. You can read all about it on Wikiphonia.

I've just finished writing a bunch of high-end headphone reviews for CNET, they'll appear soon. Sneak peeks of the Sennheiser HD 800, Grado PS-1000, and Ultrasone Edition 8 reviews will also show up here on the Audiophiliac. I've blogged about a lot of great headphones over the past year or so, but new ones keep showing up.

I also have a brand new high-end Chinese headphone that's serious competition for those established brands. I'll review it here in about a month. It's amazing.

Head-Fi is another fantastic resource for headphone fanatics.

What can I say, it's a great time for headphone lovers.

About the author

Ex-movie theater projectionist Steve Guttenberg has also worked as a high-end audio salesman, and as a record producer. Steve currently reviews audio products for CNET and works as a freelance writer for Home Theater, Inner Fidelity, Tone Audio, and Stereophile.

 

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