WiebeTech makes write-blocked access to hard drive portable

WiebeTech's newest external enclosure for forensic evidence gathering can handle four hard 3.5-inch hard drives at the same time and offer all available ways to connect to a PC.

Most people won't have any use for this thing, but if you need to analyze evidence from a hard drive without changing its content, you'll probably be interested in the Forensic RTX.

This is the newest product from WiebeTech, the maker of the UltraDock V4 and the Drive eRazer , for the forensic field.

The Forensic RTX hard drive enclosure is for the CSI set. WiebeTech

Basically, it's an external hard-drive enclosure that can house four 3.5-inch hard drives at a time. However, it differs from any regular external enclosure in many ways.

First, the device supports both the currently popular SATA and the older IDE interface standards. This means it can handle the hard drives of current desktops as well as those that were made more than 10 years go. Secondly, two of the hard drive bays feature WiebeTech's proprietary write-blocked technology that guarantees with an absolute certainty that you, and only you, can read from the hard drive.

The hard drive bays even have locks, to make sure they can't be physically tampered with. Another bonus is when you need to replace the hard drive, you don't have to unscrew anything. You just need to insert the hard drive the way you wold insert a CD in the CD Drive and then close the bay's door.

The Forensic RTX feature a plethora of connection options, including USB 2.0, FireWire 800, FireWire 400, and eSATA.

The Forensic RTX's chassis is made of sturdy aluminum that provides a rugged durability and a cooling solution.

Like I said earlier, most of us won't need one of these, but if you happen to have a use for it, make sure you start saving. The Forensic RTX can easily dig a hole in your wallet with its hefty price tag of $1,500.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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