Wi-Fi Toshiba PVP loosed on Japan

Toshiba unveils their latest Wi-Fi-enabled portable video player, the Gigabeat T, in Japan.

Photo of Toshiba Gigabeat T portable video player.
Shred the gnarl, bro. Toshiba Corp.

We still love our dear Toshiba Gigabeat S portable video player, but its definitely beginning to look its age. Lucky for us, Toshiba has announced the release of a seeming successor to the S-series called the Gigabeat T401, which is due out in Japan the first week of September. No word on when (or if) this latest video-worthy Gigabeat will hit the States, but we're optimistic after Toshiba's latest stateside release of the tiny Gigabeat U.

The Gigabeat T401 keeps the styling of the Gigabeat S but ditches the bulk of hard-drive storage in favor of leaner and more stable Flash memory. With only 4GB of space, however, the Gigabeat T is a long way from satisfying those who've outgrown their 60GB Gigabeat S. (Is it just me, or are high-capacity portable video players drying up these days?) At least the rest of the specs look accommodating: a 2.4-inch screen with 320x240 resolution; support for MP3, WMA (including DRM), WMV files, and a battery capable of 16 hours of audio and 5 hours for video.

Photo of three Toshiba Gigabeat T video players.
The Gigabeat T will be available in either puppies, flowers, or total annihilation. Toshiba Corp.

A Wi-Fi-enabled version of the Gigabeat T called the T401S will also be debuting in Japan starting in early October. I can't quite glean from the Japanese product page what the wireless connectivity will actually do. Hopefully we'll see some kind of browser support, wireless music transfer, or content streaming services. If the Japanese price is any indication, the non-Wi-Fi Gigabeat T will run around $250 if it hits the U.S.

Anyone else notice that this thing looks almost identical to the new Creative Zen player ?

(via DAP Review)

 

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