Why Facebook is requiring Messenger for chat

The social network finds a new way to annoy the world: force users to download a second app for private messages. CNET's Bridget Carey explains the latest Facebook headache. Also: how you can check if a site is safe from the dangerous Heartbleed bug.

CNET Update doesn't need another Facebook app:

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Facebook believes two Facebook apps are better than one. In this episode, learn why Facebook is being so pushy with its Messenger private-chat app. In a few days, Facebook app users will have to download the separate Messenger app to send private messages. It will no longer be optional.

Chat apps are growing in popularity and Facebook doesn't want to be left behind. Facebook recently bought the most popular chat app, WhatsApp, but it still wants to beef up its own chat service. Last week, the Messenger app was updated so anyone can make free Wi-Fi calls to others with the app.

But the bigger headache of the week is the Heartbleed bug. As major sites begin to patch this security problem, now is the time to change your passwords. CNET is keeping track of the status for the top 100 websites. You should only change a password when you know a website has patched the problem. Big sites that are fixed include Yahoo and its sister sites, like Tumblr. You'll also want to change passwords for Google/YouTube accounts and Facebook. If you're not sure if a site you use often is safe yet, you could check up on it with this tool from Qualys SSL Labs.

CNET Update delivers the tech news you need in under three minutes. Watch Bridget Carey every afternoon for a breakdown of the big stories, hot devices, new apps, and what's ahead. Subscribe to the podcast via the links below.

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