Webroot gets into Android security with new app

Webroot Mobile Security for Android, which runs on both smartphones and tablets, scans apps for malware prior to installation.

Webroot Mobile Security for Android is available at Best Buy for $14.99 per device per year.
Webroot Mobile Security for Android is available at Best Buy for $14.99 per device per year. Webroot

Security firm Webroot has announced a new app for Android users.

Dubbed Webroot Mobile Security for Android, the application, which runs on both smartphones and tablets, scans apps for malware prior to installation. It also checks URLs to block phishing attacks. The app's identity-protection feature lets users remotely lock and wipe the device, while a map and "loud alert" help users find their lost hardware. The app also features the ability for users block calls and text messages.

Webroot Mobile Security for Android might be coming at the right time. Last month, several malicious applications were found in the Android Market that had made their way onto about 260,000 Android-based devices. Google eventually removed the apps from its marketplace and deleted them from the devices they were running on.

Just a few days later, Adobe announced a Flash Player flaw that affected Android devices, in addition to Windows, Macintosh, Linux, and Solaris users. The company said at the time that the flaw could cause a device to crash or "potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system."

Webroot's app joins several others in trying to protect Android users. Symantec, McAfee, and Lookout are among the companies that offer Android security apps.

Like those other solutions, Webroot's Mobile Security for Android is available in the Android Market for free. However, the premium, full-featured option, which adds remote wipe and the app inspector, is available only via Best Buy. It retails for $14.99 per year per device.

 

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