'We need a tough solar-powered watch' and more of the best CNET comments

Each week, we round up some of the most thoughtful comments from the CNET community.

A mockup showing what an Apple iWatch might look like.
A mockup showing what an Apple iWatch might look like. Sarah Tew and Christopher MacManus/CNET

Last week, we kicked off the first regular roundup of the best CNET comments. You responded in kind with a long and illuminating discussion of and lesson on voltage and Faraday cages. Thanks for that.

This week, CNET readers shared thoughts on topics ranging from future smart watches to Facebook's ad model and the soon-to-be-born Moto X. Enjoy this selection and buckle up for next week, when a raft of big tech announcements should make for good discussion.

-Lindsey Turrentine, Editor in Chief of CNET Reviews


Great tech-spectations: What's next in tech for 2013

by John P. Falcone ( Read article )

A boring summer for tech is about to get a lot more exciting. Here's what to expect.

Emilio2000: Lots of new smartwatches coming from various watchmakers. But, if the watch stops working the moment it gets wet or goes without recharging too long, it's worthless. What we really need is a tough solar-powered watch that has a compass and an altimeter. A watch that can pass the "Robinson Crusoe" test: 5 years on a desert island, after first surviving the swim to shore. Most battery-operated watches will either be destroyed by the water or the batteries will be dead after a few days or a few years. Why is it that only Casio is capable of producing a solar-powered watch? Where is the competition? See post.

Images of alleged Motorola Moto X specs, benchmarks leak

by Steven Musil ( Read article )

bweber85: This phone is going to be a game changer because of its aggressive pricing. Wait and see. The Nexus 7 is very competitively priced and the Nexus 4 is the best phone for the money by a long shot. Those devices were made with other companies, so Google couldn't set the bar exactly where it wanted to because these companies (Asus, LG) wanted to have a profit. This is coming from Moto, a subsidiary of Google. I think that you will see this phone sell for as low as $250, no contract. I would say the highest they will sell it for will be $300. This company is the complete opposite of Apple and other companies. They want you to buy their devices, and not charge an arm and a leg for you to get it.

GAME CHANGER!!! See post.

Sony MDR-V6 headphones review: A classic headphone endures for a reason

by Steve Guttenberg ( Read article )

First introduced in 1985, the comfortable fitting Sony MDR-V6s are arguably the best-sounding headphones for under $100.

LemmingRush: Yup rocking 15-year-old MDR-V600 headphones here. I was going to get the V6 back in the 90's but the 600 was all the Sony store had so I just got those. I have listened to so many headphones over the years and I just can't replace these things.

I know people like the Sennheiser's for a number of different qualities, I like how they sound, but I've noticed they will overdrive way before the Sonys. When you're mixing sound live, that's super annoying. Also a 15-year-old working $100 pair of headphones is really impressive.

*Edit: I just realized I have the 700s not the 600s. See post.

HTC Butterfly S review: Swift processor, fat battery offset by cheap plastic

by Aloysius Low ( Read review )

Meet the new HTC Butterfly S, which features a faster processor and higher-capacity battery than the company's flagship, the HTC One.

jayps21: This can be the phone that puts HTC over the top in the U.S...specially with the One grabbing so many of Apple's and Samsung's customers.

I hope Verizon does get it and they keep the SD slot! This will be the best move HTC and Verizon can make. It would make no sense to release the One on Verizon this late and the upgrade from a 4.7-inch to 5-inch display will separate the DNA from the One.

Fingers crossed....if not, Galaxy S4 will be my next phone; 5-inch display and SD slot has me sold. See post.

Twitter creator finally learns Facebook, suggests monthly fee

by Jennifer Van Grove ( Read article )

Biz Stone thinks he has a brilliant idea for Facebook that could help the social network bring in $1 billion in revenue per month.

Sageman99: Charging customers to have an ad-free platform is nothing new; although, I do agree it's a good way for Facebook to bring in revenue. As for charging customers to learn how to use Facebook, I don't agree with. The whole problem right now with organizations worldwide is a lack of customer service. It's horrendous. I truly do believe if organizations want to do their best and are really there for their customers they will do whatever they have to do to keep them happy. In my opinion charging people to learn how to use their overcomplicated platform is not focusing on customer satisfaction and the solution. There is a whole market out there for freelancers to focus on that area. I believe it's in Facebook's best interest to offer the best customer service possible and eliminate overcomplicated processes. See post.
 

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