WD VelociRaptor high-end hard drive hits 1TB

Western Digital announces the availability of its high-end VelociRaptor hard drive that spins at 10,000rpm and offers up to 1TB of storage space.

Western Digital

Before solid-state drives (SSD), Western Digital's Raptor family of hard drives had always been the fastest internal drive for consumers. And spinning at 10,000 RPM, these drives are still very fast though offering less storage than other 7,200rpm hard drives.

That gap has just gotten narrower; the company announced today the latest VelociRaptor hard drive that caps at 1TB of storage space.

While 1TB seems small compared with other 3.5-inch hard drives that offer up to 4TB, the new VelociRaptor, like the previous two generations, actually comes in the 2.5-inch standard. However, it is extra thick and has an added metal frame to be as physically big as a regular 3.5-inch hard drive.

WD says the new hard drive leverages enterprise-class mechanics to provide 24-7 durability under high-performance workloads, and is especially useful for applications that require a lot of writing to disk, such as video editing and digital content creation and management. These are applications where SSDs, with their limited program cycles, show weakness.

Specs-wise, in addition to spinning at 10,000rpm, the new VelociRaptor supports SATA 3 (6Gbps) and sports 64MB of cache memory. According to WD, the drive also offers ultracool operations, requiring less power than previous generations. It comes with Rotary Acceleration Feed Forward (RAFF) technology that optimizes operation and performance when the drives are used environments that have lots of vibration, and NoTouch ramp load technology that is designed to improve life span of the drive by ensuring that the recording head never touches the media.

The new VelociRaptor hard drive is available now in 1TB, 500GB, and 250GB capacities that carry the price tags of $320, $210, and $160, respectively.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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