WD ships 4TB enterprise-grade hard drive

Western Digital announces the availability of the WD RE, a high-end, high-capacity hard drive that offers up to 4TB storage and supports the SAS and SATA standards.

WD

Western Digital announced today the availability of its WD RE internal 3.5-inch hard drive, which offers up to 4TB of storage space.

This new drive is available in either the SAS or SATA interface standards. The former is used in enterprise/business products such as servers, while the latter is also used in consumer products, such as desktop computers. While WD says the new drive combines capacity with enterprise-class features, the fact that a SATA version of the drive is also available means that consumers can also benefit.

As far as specs go, the new drive has a 6Gbps SAS or SATA III interface and 64MB of cache, and spins at 7,200rpm. Unlike the WD VelociRaptor, which is tuned for top performance, the WD RE is mostly intended for systems that require both capacity and reliability, such as file servers, NAS servers, or video recorders. It's not slow, however, reportedly offering better performance than regular 7,200rpm hard drives on the market.

According to WD, the RE is a five-disk platform with 800GB per platter and offers dual-port, full-duplex connectivity with up to 1.4 MTBF, for high long-term reliability. The drive's NoTouch ramp load technology keeps its recording heads from touching the disk media, so there's significantly less wear on recording heads and on media and better drive protection in transit, the company says. Also, its Dual Stage Actuation (DSA) and Rotary Acceleration Feed Forward (RAFF) features are supposed to ensure that the drive offers consistent performance when used in a vibration-prone environment, such as a multidrive chassis.

The new WD RE hard drive is available in capacities ranging from 1TB to 4TB, with the 4TB version costing about $460 for SATA or $480 for SAS. It comes with a five-year warranty.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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