Watch the first public Macintosh demo in newly released video

After the Macintosh's initial unveiling for shareholders, Steve Jobs gave the first public demonstration of the computer just a few days later. The video of that meeting has just been unearthed for the first time.

Jobs introduces the Macintosh to the public for the first time. Video screenshot by Eric Mack/CNET

We all know that Steve Jobs unveiled the Macintosh at Apple's annual shareholder meeting on January 24, 1984, but he also gave an encore performance of sorts a few days later for a meeting of the Boston Computer Society.

The video of that January 30, 1984, meeting can be seen below. It was released for the first time Saturday since it was shot that day and ran over at with lots of the great context surrounding that meeting. While the scripted presentation is much the same as the original unveiling six days earlier, the video quality is significantly better at the Boston event, and Jobs seems more polished.

It's also interesting to watch the question-and-answer session after Jobs' pitch since the audience is filled with actual users and probably some of the era's top nerds querying the Macintosh team on everything from the system hardware to the justification of text in MacWrite. There's a great moment toward the end when host Jonathan Rotenberg announces that a future meeting will feature a speaker from IBM, the company that Jobs had just finished bashing. Audible laughs and boos can be heard from the audience.

The 90-minute video ends with Steve Wozniak and members of the Macintosh team heading into the audience to answer some questions one-on-one, something that seems pretty inconceivable to imagine Apple executives doing today.

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