Watch ESPN programming on iOS-based devices

Sports network launches a new application that lets people use their iOS-based devices to watch content from its flagship channel, as well as from ESPN2, ESPNU, and ESPN3.com.

ESPN has launched a new app for iOS-based devices.
ESPN has launched a new app for iOS-based devices. ESPN

ESPN is ensuring its viewers don't miss a single minute of the game.

The network announced today that it has launched a new application in Apple's App Store, called WatchESPN. After downloading the free app, users can watch live programming from ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, and ESPN3.com 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The network was quick to point out that the app is available to iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch customers in time for major sporting events, including the "early rounds of the Masters, the NBA Playoffs, and the beginning of the Major League Baseball season."

However, there is a catch. In order to access ESPN content from an iOS-based device, the person must be a Time Warner Cable, Bright House Networks, or Verizon FiOS TV subscriber who pays for ESPN channels. After downloading the app, users must input "cable subscriber credentials" in order to prove they are a customer of one of those companies, ESPN said.

The network also noted that the app, which was actually made available in the App Store yesterday, isn't yet "optimized" for the iPad. It plans to start taking full advantage of Apple's tablet in May.

The addition of WatchESPN to the App Store could be a boon for sports fans--or at least the ones with iOS devices. Aside from Dish's iPad app, which lets folks watch live programming with the help of the Sling adapter, ESPN content has only been available on Time Warner Cable's recently launched TWCable TV app . That app only offers access to ESPNews.

ESPN said that it plans to make its app available to other platforms, including Android, "in the near future."

 

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