Wacom revamps 21-inch Cintiq display-tablet

The new Cintiq 21UX display tablet is more sensitive and offers new touch strips on the back to adjust brush size or other settings.

The Cintiq 21UX combines a relatively large display with pen tablet technology to let people interact directly with what they see.
The Cintiq 21UX combines a relatively large display with pen tablet technology to let people interact directly with what they see. Wacom

Well-funded digital artists take note: Wacom has announced its Cintiq 21UX, a second-generation device that combines a 21.3-inch display with the company's pen-controlled tablet.

The new Cintiq is geared toward artists, designers, and others who benefit from being able to draw or otherwise interact directly with images on the screen rather than through a separate tablet or mouse. It doesn't come cheap, though, with a price of $1,999 when it ships in late March or early April.

The color LCD, with a resolution 1600x1200, can be laid flat or rotated one way or the other up to 180 degrees in its stand, or dismounted altogether, Wacom said in its Monday announcement. On the back are two "touch strips" that let a finger slide adjust properties such as zoom or drawing brush size.

The Cintiq also has 2,048 levels of pressure sensitivity; with the new "Tip Sensor" technology, it detects as little pressure as that of 1 gram pushing on the display, Wacom said. In addition to detecting pen pressure and tilt, the Cintiq can detect rotation for drawing applications such as Adobe Systems' Photoshop and Illustrator and Corel's Painter 11 that support the feature for tasks such as calligraphy, Wacom said.

Wacom introduced its first 21-inch Cintiq model in 2005. It also offers the $999 Cintiq 12wx , a smaller wide-screen model.

The Cintiq 21UX can be laid flat if desired.
The Cintiq 21UX can be laid flat if desired. Wacom
The Cintiq 21UX mounts to a stand that lets it rotate; the combination weighs 22.4 pounds.
The Cintiq 21UX mounts to a stand that lets it rotate; the combination weighs 22.4 pounds. Wacom
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About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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