Verizon's Fios to run Google TV Ads

Advertisers using Google for television ad placement will now have another outlet for their wares with the Verizon deal.

Google has found another partner for its television advertising project in a familiar place.

Verizon Communications' Fios TV service has signed a deal with Google TV Ads to feature video ads uploaded to Google by advertisers wanting to use the search giant's self-service ad tools, the companies announced today.

Advertisers will be able to reach an additional 3.3 million homes with the deal, which will see Verizon and Google collaborating on yet another project, in line with their strong Android partnership and joint efforts on Net neutrality .

Google TV Ads doesn't get as much buzz as other parts of the company's advertising network, but Google has been plugging away at the effort for several years after shutting down similar services for print and radio advertising. Businesses that already have accounts with Google for search or display advertising can also get into television through Google TV Ads, but it's not clear how much of Google's huge search-advertising base has flirted with the small screen. Google also signed up DirecTV earlier this year as a partner.

This is a separate project from Google TV, which currently doesn't feature any advertising, but it's likely only a matter of time before Google starts experimenting with ads there. It will have to get a little more traction in the market, however; early reviews of Google TV, including CNET's , were not overwhelming.

About the author

    Tom Krazit writes about the ever-expanding world of Google, as the most prominent company on the Internet defends its search juggernaut while expanding into nearly anything it thinks possible. He has previously written about Apple, the traditional PC industry, and chip companies. E-mail Tom.

     

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