Verizon Wireless debuts the Samsung Glyde

The Samsung Glyde offers Verizon Wireless customers a touch screen and a full alphabetic keyboard. CNET gives it a full review to see how it rates.

Presenting the Samsung Glyde... Corinne Schulze/CNET Networks

Samsung and Verizon Wireless on Thursday announced the Samsung Glyde (aka the SCH-U940), a touch-screen cell phone based on the Samsung SGH-F700 . All signs originally pointed to a May 9 release date, but Samsung and Verizon had an itchy trigger finger. But no matter what the reason, sooner is always better, particularly if it involves putting a high-profile device through its paces with a review.

Offering a touch screen and a slider design that hides a full alphabetic keyboard, the Glyde is a powerful phone with a full set of features. Inside you'll find Bluetooth, a full HTML browser, GPS, and 3G support. In many ways it rivals the iPhone and Verizon's LG Voyager, but at the end of the day it can't quite match those devices. We really wanted to like its touch interface but the Glyde's small display didn't do it or the Web browser justice. The resulting effect was not only crowded, but also clunky. Fortunately, the QWERTY keyboard fares better.

On the upside, call quality was excellent and the 3G features performed reasonably well. We wouldn't keep the photos from the 2-megapixel camera as keepsakes, but the Glyde's multimedia capabilities measure up well against other Verizon 3G phones. For a full analysis, check out our Samsung Glyde review and be sure to take a look at our Samsung Glyde photo gallery.

About the author

Kent German leads CNET's How To coverage and is the senior managing editor of CNET Magazine. A veteran of CNET since 2003, he started in San Francisco and is now based in the London office. When not at work, he's planning his next trip to Australia, going for a run, or watching planes land at the airport (yes, really).

 

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