Upcoming iOS update likely to kneecap Evasi0n jailbreak

Apple's next iOS update could shut down a popular jailbreaking tool, a move that's been long expected.

Jailbreaking an iPhone with the help of Evasi0n.
Jailbreaking an iPhone with the help of Evasi0n. Jason Cipriani/CNET

One of the most popular jailbreaking tools for iOS could be snuffed out as part of an upcoming software update from Apple.

iOS 6.1.3, which Apple gave to developers for testing last week, reportedly keeps Evasi0n from being installed, leaving would-be jailbreakers in a lurch.

Evasi0n came out earlier this month and gives iPhone, iPod, and iPad owners deeper access to the software on their devices than Apple allows. The two key benefits for those who install it is that you can make significant changes to basic system software, as well as add additional apps through third-party software stores.

The software set records for being the fastest downloaded and broadest jailbreak in the history of Apple's platform, which has broadened from iPhones and iPods with the release of the iPad and iPad Mini.

Apple discourages the practice, saying it can cause potential instability of the system as well as apps. The company has a long history of patching iOS in ways that keep these exploits from working. One of the big breakthroughs for Evasi0n was that the software was able to get around some of these security measures and work on newer devices through an exploit in Apple's time zone software settings, something that's been fixed in iOS 6.1.3, Forbes reports.

Even with that fix, Evasi0n's creators remain hopeful. In an interview with Forbes, one of the software's creators said a number of other bugs have been found that could provide the groundwork for another jailbreak.

Apple's been pushing out the software updates hot and heavy to fix embarrassing bugs with Microsoft Exchange, as well as cellular network connectivity. Its most recent patch, released last week, fixed an issue that let anyone gain access to a user's contact list, even if they didn't have the device's passcode -- something that can still be accomplished through alternate means.

 

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