Twitter hiccups through a semi-outage

Weekend Twitterers have been reporting messages not going out to the world. The company points to some maintenance work as the root cause, and says it's working on a fix.

The Twitter community may not be paying much heed to your posts this weekend, but it's not your fault.

The company behind the messaging service and Web 2.0 darling acknowledged late Saturday that some back-end changes had been failing to show tweets from a number of people. A post on the Twitter site from a person identified as "goldtoe, Official Rep," had this to say:

This is a result of some of the caching changes we made during last night's maintenance window. While those changes have made the service more stable over all, there have been some unintended effects.

We're aware of the problem and are working through it. It may take a bit to resolve but we are on it.

Twitter outage
ParisLemon.com

The post--which has a box noting that "106 people have this problem"--went on to say that "this solves the problem," but goldtoe some hours later updated things: "Just to be clear - we know the problem is not yet fixed. We still have work to do."

Some Twitter users on the forum indicated that they had been able to find workarounds, but others continued to report posts going MIA.

Outside Twitter itself, the outages got some attention from blogger MG Siegler on his ParisLemon site:

I noticed a few people thinking the same thing as me today: is everyone taking a break from Twitter? People do get burnt out from the web after all and it was a pretty nice weekend day in a lot of cities. But no, Twitter is broken. People are updating and most of the updates are simply not coming through.

Click on some of your friends' profiles. You'll see they have updates, yet those updates are probably not in your Twitter stream. But some are, making things even more confusing, and making it harder for people to tell that Twitter is broken.

About the author

Jonathan Skillings is managing editor of CNET News, based in the Boston bureau. He's been with CNET since 2000, after a decade in tech journalism at the IDG News Service, PC Week, and an AS/400 magazine. He's also been a soldier and a schoolteacher, and will always be a die-hard fan of jazz, the brassier the better.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

iPhone running slow?

Here are some quick fixes for some of the most common problem in iOS 7.