TV show from WikiLeaks' Julian Assange due April 17

"The World Tomorrow" will air on the RT network, and be released online, this coming Tuesday, says WikiLeaks.

Julian Assange, in a trailer for his upcoming TV show, "The World Tomorrow." Screenshot by Edward Moyer/CNET

The new TV show from WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is set to air April 17 on the RT network and be released online the same day, according to WikiLeaks.

"The World Tomorrow" (trailer embedded below) will feature Assange interviewing "an eclectic range of guests, who are stamping their mark on the future: politicians, revolutionaries, intellectuals, artists, and visionaries," the document-dump site said in an online announcement at worldtomorrow.wikileaks.org. WikiLeaks said a dozen 26-minute episodes of the program have been completed.

The organization said the programs and transcripts will be made available online and that "arrangements are currently being made with other licensees to publish longer edits of the series." It said "other networks" would eventually offer the show.

RT, formerly Russia Today, is a global multilingual TV news network based in the Russian Federation and funded by the state. The Moscow Times has said of it: "For some, Russia Today is a mouthpiece that spreads Kremlin propaganda around the world. For others, the state-bankrolled channel is a vital voice that offers different political viewpoints in an ocean of media monotony." And Slate has called it "Russia's answer to Fox News and MSNBC."

WikiLeaks said RT is the show's first licensee and had nothing to do with its production. The show, it said, is being produced by Assange-founded Quick Roll Productions in partnership with Dartmouth Films, a U.K.-based producer of independent films. It's being distributed by Journeyman Pictures.

WikiLeaks incurred the wrath of the U.S. government by posting a vast respository of classified and sensitive documents from military and diplomatic sources. A U.S. soldier, Bradley Manning, has been charged with supplying a large portion of that haul to Assange and WikiLeaks.

Separately, Assange, who has been living in the U.K. under bail, is awaiting extradition to Sweden on charges that he sexually assaulted two women in 2010, charges that he has vehemently denied.

In November, Assange lost an initial appeal to avoid extradition but is now waiting for his case to be heard by the Supreme Court.

CNET's Lance Whitney contributed to this report.

 

ARTICLE DISCUSSION

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

Hot on CNET

CNET's giving away a 3D printer

Enter for a chance to win* the MakerBot Replicator 3D Printer and all the supplies you need to get started.