Trouble with Google, RIM and Nic Cage

Google may pay record fine for its privacy gaffe, BlackBerry-maker on hunt for fresh Board, and we all learn a valuable lesson from today's viral sensation.

Google, Canadians and Nic Cage. Tuesday's top tech stories are nuthin' but trouble.

Google may pay a record $22.5 million to the Federal Trade Commission to settle a charge over a privacy violation made public six months ago. Google is accused of exploiting a loophole around user privacy settings in Apple's Safari browser. And the Wall Street Journal says this would be the largest penalty a single company has been asked to pay to the FTC. The Journal first brought the issue to light and exposed how Google used a code to get around privacy controls. Ad cookies were tracking Safari users, even if tracking was disabled.

Google disabled the questionable cookies, Google has found itself in similar situations. Last year it was feeling the heat with the FTC over Google Buzz , then it forked over $25,000 to the FCC for "obstructing" an investigation about Street View, and there was also a $500 million settlement over the illegal promotion of drug ads.

How many strikes before Google loses credibility with you? Or do you just shrug your shoulders and roll your eyes every time another tech company is accused of tampering with our privacy? It's getting harder to put your trust into any tech company these days. Share your thoughts with a 15-second video using Tout. Your comment could make it on a future show.

And in other big stories, BlackBerry-maker RIM is searching for some fresh blood in its Board of Directors. Shareholders didn't vote anyone out, but did voice concerns about the company's direction.

A new feature on Xbox Live, the Kinect PlayFit , will track the calories you burn while playing Kinect games, like Dance Central 2 and Kinect Star Wars.

The Next Issue app is a Netflix for magazines and is now available on the iPad. This could really shake things up for the publishing world.

And today's show ends with some good life advice. If you're hunting for a job, you better spruce up that LinkedIn profile. A recent report shows 93 percent of recuriters are using it to find qualified candidates.

Also, be sure to double check what you attach in any emails sent to recruiters. You don't want to confuse your resume and cover letter with another computer file... such as a crazy-eyed .jpg of Nicolas Cage.

Use Tout anytime to message Bridget with a 15 second video reply from your webcam or smartphone camera, and your video could end up on the show. Or, simply post a reply video to the CNET YouTube channel. You can also shoot over an email.

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